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ABDUL MOMIN
May 11, 2022
In Wellness Forum
How do you calculate keyword density? The formula is straightforward: Divide the number of times a keyword is used on your page by the total number of words on the page. Here's an easy example: Your page has 1,000 words and your keyword is used 10 times. This gives: 10 / 1000 = .001 Multiply this by 100 to get a percentage, which in this case is 1%. There's also another formula sometimes used to assess keyword usage: TF-IDF, which stands for "term frequency-inverse document frequency". The idea here is to assess the frequency of a keyword on specific pages (TF) against the number of times this word appears across multiple pages on your site (IDF). The result helps determine how relevant your keyword is for specific pages. While TF is straightforward, it's easy to get sidetracked by IDF. Here, the goal is to understand the rarity of your keyword across multiple documents. IDF is measured in values between 0 and 1 — the closer to 0, the more a word appears across your pages. The closer to 1, the more it appears on a single page and no others. This is the "inverse" nature of the calculation: lower values mean more keyword use. Consider this formula in practice. Applied to very common words such as "the" or "but", the TD-IDF score will approach zero. Applied to a specific keyword, the value should be much closer to 1 — if not, you may need to reconsider your keyword strategy. What is good keyword density? While there are no hard and fast rules for keyword density beyond Cork Ladies Bicycles Zone always-relevant "don't keyword stuff" advice, many SEOs recommend using approximately 1-2 keyword for every 100 words of copy. That factors in to about 1-2% keyword density. Your content may perform similarly with slightly more or slightly less, but general wisdom holds that Google and other search engines respond well to keyword density around 0.5%. It's also worth remembering the value of keyword variants — words and phrases that are similar, but not identical, to your primary keyword. Let's say your website sells outdoor lighting solutions. While your highest-value keyword for SERPs is "outdoor lighting", stuffing as many uses of this keyword into as many pages as possible will reduce rather than improve overall SEO. Instead, consider keyword variants; terms that are close to your primary keyword but not an exact copy. In the case of "outdoor lighting", variants such as "garden lighting", "patio lighting", "deck lighting" or "landscape lighting" can help your page rank higher without running afoul of keyword-stuffing rules.
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